Cuba Independently – Part 3: Trinidad

If you want to experience the physicality of rugby firsthand then I suggest you arrive in Trinidad by bus. The cackle, scrum and maul of casa owners waiting for the bus was quite extraordinary, if amusing. It was a hectic start to what was one of the most peaceful places I visited.

Plaza Mayor - The centre of Trinidad

Plaza Mayor – The centre of Trinidad

But the word I most associate with Trinidad is quaint. Most of the buildings date back to the sugar plantation days of the 19th Century and have been preserved to a tee. The town is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and rightfully so. The cobblestone streets add to the charm. They also reduce the noise levels as motorised vehicles, with the exception of mopeds, are unable to access the centre of the town. Aggressive taxi jinteros, the bane of my visit to Cuba, were thankfully absent although waited like vultures on nearby tarmac streets.

P1010818

The Sierra del Escambray mountains form the backdrop to many streets

The town’s bars and restaurants were excellent, and bus station staff were friendly and efficient. In fact, the bus station was the only one in Cuba I could pre-book a ticket from. The town has a large number of art galleries and craft outlets. None of the sellers were pushy, making the shopping experience a pleasant one.

Casa de la Trova

The famous Casa de la Trova

The only downside of Trinidad was the trip to and from Playa Ancon. The shuttle bus from the Cubatur office was broken down (because it probably doesn’t exist in the first place) but there were plenty of taxis waiting outside (how convenient). Refusing to go along with this rip-off mentality I got a taxi from outside the Iberostar Grand Hotel. The driver didn’t stick to the original price agreed and, from what I could understand, threatened me if I didn’t pay. I threw the original sum agreed on the seat and got out of the car as quick as I could. This and other instances I experienced and witnessed convinced me that the safety of solo female travellers in Cuba is a concern. Other solo female travellers I met felt the same. Was Playa Ancon worth the hassle? It’s a nice beach but it isn’t paradise. It has good facilities and a choice of water-sports on offer, along with the trappings of beachside hotels.

Playa Ancon looking towards Hotel Club Amigo Ancon 1

Playa Ancon looking towards Hotel Club Amigo

Trinidad was not on my initial itinerary. In her book, The Island that Dared, Dervla Murphy considered it too touristy. But the feedback from so many independent travellers couldn’t be ignored and thankfully convinced me to change course. So my first piece of advice? Give yourself at least two nights there. And my final bit of advice? Prepare to ‘play’ a contact sport upon arrival!

For further Cuba travel information check out my Cuba page.

© Hazel Joy 2016

2 thoughts on “Cuba Independently – Part 3: Trinidad

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s